While a weekend away with from friends someone played this song and everyone’s ears perked. “Who is this???? I really like it!” His name is Tomas Barfod. He is Danish. That is all you need to know.

- Melon

(Source: Spotify)

Video tagged as: music spotify
My friend Joe Dunn has a great ear. When he told me he had been listening to Caribou’s latest album a ton, I decided to do the same myself. 
Caribou = Canadian Dan Snaith. He received a doctorate in Overconvergent Siegel Modular Symbols (math!) from Imperial College London in 2005, the same year he released his first album as Caribou. Pitchfork describes his sound as “body music,” which I thought was spot on. 
Pitchfork’s review of Our Love had some really nice moments to it, and I thought I’d share an excerpt here: 
Our Love is a quietly ambitious record, despite its modest title: in documenting Snaith’s personal vision of love, it seeks to render love in all of its universally complicated glory. It’s a warts-and-all depiction of a state of being that’s so often constrained to one or two facets in pop songs: obsession and disconnection, passion and jealousy, companionship and loneliness, all given equal weight. From the outside, Snaith looks the picture of domestic bliss, or at least stability—he’s been married for 13 years, and his first child was born in 2011—but many of Our Love’s lyrics hint at romantic trouble or marital discomfort. Nameless characters feel mistreated, are haunted by lurking suitors and bad memories, lament their broken love, look towards the future; when they’re in love, it’s with an intensity that verges on the maniacal. But it’s reasonable to conclude that the album’s songs aren’t near-direct transcriptions of events and feelings from Snaith’s life; instead, they’re extremes pulled from the necessarily complicated life two people build together over years and years, rich with joy but laden with baggage. 
In any long-term relationship, there are moments of deadening melancholy where you feel like your organs have been put through an industrial shredder. It’s in those moments where you sniff at imagining your life completely different, or even with someone else—fantasies enabled by intense emotional pain. And then, somehow, things get better, and your heart is overflowing with love; you’re almost in disbelief, thinking, “How could I imagine a different life, even for a second?” Our Love captures the zig-zag between these two poles with an authenticity and honesty few albums manage, and the album’s excellent two singles, “Can’t Do Without You” and “Our Love”, focus on the latter sensation.
Here are those two singles, but you should really give the whole album a listen if you haven’t yet! 
— basil

My friend Joe Dunn has a great ear. When he told me he had been listening to Caribou’s latest album a ton, I decided to do the same myself. 

Caribou = Canadian Dan Snaith. He received a doctorate in Overconvergent Siegel Modular Symbols (math!) from Imperial College London in 2005, the same year he released his first album as Caribou. Pitchfork describes his sound as “body music,” which I thought was spot on. 

Pitchfork’s review of Our Love had some really nice moments to it, and I thought I’d share an excerpt here: 

Our Love is a quietly ambitious record, despite its modest title: in documenting Snaith’s personal vision of love, it seeks to render love in all of its universally complicated glory. It’s a warts-and-all depiction of a state of being that’s so often constrained to one or two facets in pop songs: obsession and disconnection, passion and jealousy, companionship and loneliness, all given equal weight. From the outside, Snaith looks the picture of domestic bliss, or at least stability—he’s been married for 13 years, and his first child was born in 2011—but many of Our Love’s lyrics hint at romantic trouble or marital discomfort. Nameless characters feel mistreated, are haunted by lurking suitors and bad memories, lament their broken love, look towards the future; when they’re in love, it’s with an intensity that verges on the maniacal. But it’s reasonable to conclude that the album’s songs aren’t near-direct transcriptions of events and feelings from Snaith’s life; instead, they’re extremes pulled from the necessarily complicated life two people build together over years and years, rich with joy but laden with baggage.

In any long-term relationship, there are moments of deadening melancholy where you feel like your organs have been put through an industrial shredder. It’s in those moments where you sniff at imagining your life completely different, or even with someone else—fantasies enabled by intense emotional pain. And then, somehow, things get better, and your heart is overflowing with love; you’re almost in disbelief, thinking, “How could I imagine a different life, even for a second?” Our Love captures the zig-zag between these two poles with an authenticity and honesty few albums manage, and the album’s excellent two singles, “Can’t Do Without You” and “Our Love”, focus on the latter sensation.

Here are those two singles, but you should really give the whole album a listen if you haven’t yet! 

— basil

Photo tagged as: caribou our_love can_t_do_without_you

alt-J “Left Hand Free” 

Well, your left hand’s free

And your right’s in a grip

With another left hand 

Watch his right hand slip

Towards his gun, oh, no

Take me back to summer and floating on the Madison River.

-carrwest

Video tagged as: altj_lefthandfree

This track is a touch old, but it’s worth a late post. As NPR wrote: “Nothing is perfect, but some things nearly are, and Todd Terje’s song ‘Inspector Norse’ is one of them.” You’ll enjoy it, I promise.

—basil

(Source: Spotify)

Video tagged as: music spotify
Want to listen to all of LTB’s music in one go? Check out our Spotify playlist: 

Want to listen to all of LTB’s music in one go? Check out our Spotify playlist

Photo tagged as:

image

Swoon. Adam Bainbridge of Kindness posted the photo above of Robyn doing her grandmother’s makeup on the set of their upcoming music video “Who Do You Love." Given that Robyn’s Nana is involved- I know we can expect great things. 

Aloe 

Text tagged as: kindness robyn grandmas
I take your gloom
I cut it up and puff it into bloom 
Right my little pooh bear, wanna take a chance? 
Wanna sip this smooth air, kick it in the sand 
I’d say I told you so but you just gonna cry 
You just wanna know those peanut butter vibes

I love peanut butter vibes!
If you’re on the hunt for some Friday weirdness, check out the music video for this song.
Happy Friday! 
-basil

I take your gloom

I cut it up and puff it into bloom

Right my little pooh bear, wanna take a chance?

Wanna sip this smooth air, kick it in the sand

I’d say I told you so but you just gonna cry

You just wanna know those peanut butter vibes

I love peanut butter vibes!

If you’re on the hunt for some Friday weirdness, check out the music video for this song.

Happy Friday! 

-basil

Photo tagged as: gooey glass_animals

Mina Tindle makes me dream of rainy Parisian days (very much like today’s weather in NYC). You might recognize her voice on The National’s Boxer album. She stepped out on her own a couple years ago and just released a new ablum.

- Melon

(Source: Spotify)

Video tagged as: music spotify

Remix by André Allen Anjos.
Original by MS MR.

source: Soundcloud

Woke up with this song playing in my head= dancing all day long. I am a fan of almost anything that RAC touches, but this song is particularly good.

-carrwest

Video tagged as: msmr_rac

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